Dressage Bits

Training Bits

Store quality dressage and Weymouth Bits now online by Schneider's Saddlery, to promote Flexion & collection and offers subtle hints. Dressur Bits & Nosebands Bite and nose strap make this perfect combination with the horse's jaw possible. "If the teeth are well and properly placed and the nose band is not too close, the discussion can be clear and even subtile, and above all, it becomes a dialogue," says Politz. On the contrary, "if the teeth are too strong and the nose is too narrow, the horse's jaws become deaf.

" It' s no less of a concern, he adds,'if the bits are too low and the nose band too loosen. This is mutilating and bewildering for the equine. This is a little and nosebands, both suitable for the horses and used properly by their riders. Politz explained that the choice of set of teeth for a dressage stallion is dependent on several factors:

  • the form of the taste buds (the top of the mouth). "But it makes no point putting a very thick piece in a small opening with a small diastem. "It' generally acknowledged that there should be two folds where the tip contacts the corner of the oral cavity.

Otherwise the bruises on the lip cause the resistance of the horses. Not a single piece - no matter how it is designed and constructed - will maintain sensible communications between the rider's hand and the horse's jaws if the nose band that the animal is carrying is unsuitable/incorrect. "Thin nosebands, especially in combination with thin (strong) teeth that may have already made the oral cavity impervious, can even make you numb," Politz states.

"If all this happens, the stallion goes into protective fashion and grasps the teeth while squeezing his jaw. It' s a pity that the invention of the so-called nose strap has led many horsemen to do exactly that: to twist the horse' s muzzle, he states. "Not only because it harms the horse's well-being and runs counter to the classical proper workout, but also because it is proof of bad equestrianism.

"It is of the utmost importance, as a judge," says Fromming, "that the bridles sit well. "I' ve always made sure that the nose band was not too close or too low or that the teeth did not appear too slender. With this system, the nose strap with the handle is certainly a big issue, because you can tighten the nose strap very much.

For as long as I can recall, there have been debates about how to put on a ribbon properly. As in so many places, the basic principle is that there must be room for two digits between the bridge of the nostril and the strap. "I see the greatest fault these days is too narrow nosebands," says de Wispelaere.

"If you go to a saddlery, most of your fangs have a nose strap. "Occasionally, the much-loved trainer meets a stallion in his hospitals whose nose strap is too narrow. Regarding his own ponies, Politz says that his own preferences are the old-fashioned nose band, "which unfortunately has gone out of fashion".

" Says the fallen band can be quite hard to install. "When the belt over the nostrils is too long and the chinstrap is only slightly tight, the joining metallic bands can push on the ends of the teeth," he states. You need one for every horse's heads.

It' important to place a fallen ribbon high enough on the nostril to allow the horse's holes to flutter," he added. "He states that several advantages are associated with a properly set noseband: This prevents the lower mandible from being limited in its movement and allows the equine dentition to be chewed in comfort.

"However, if a narrow nose strap makes the saddle press his jaw, he will grip the teeth - like a hound that won't let go of a bones - and he will become heavier in the rider's hands when he starts to sit on his shoulder and forequarters. It is possible for a powerful horseman to raise the horses heads and throat.

However, this mistakenly compels the horses into the so-called total self-transport (absolute height) instead of comparative self-transport (relative height). Decorating the bridles of a dressage stallion is a constant theme.

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