Patent Horse Riding Boots

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Riding shoe and stirrup

This invention refers to riding equipment and in particular to means which keep the equestrian footgear in touch with the stapes of a horse during manoeuvres. The invention refers to a shape of the horseman's boots. There is a high inherent danger of personal injuries when the horse falls and this is heightened by the chance that a rider's boots may get caught or hang in a stapes during a crash.

Climbing frame are known as footrests when riding together with a seat on e.g. a horse or other mount. In addition, a cushion between the stapes and the horse's feet is used to guarantee good frictional and cushioning properties. There are different kinds of temples and pods available on the marked with a high frictional finish at the driver's heel.

However, one obstacle with this kind of stapes is that soil or loam adhering to the stapes, padding or feet worsens the rubbing of the saddle-raiser. Further disadvantages in combination with brackets and cushions are the correct position of the base in the bracket.

It can be a safety hazard, especially for novices, if the horse is falling, as it can be hard for the horse to free itself. Dismantling the horse can also be hard if the rider's feet have slid too far into the stirrups.

The aim of this invention is to create a system for use in conjunction with a stapes while riding that allows the rider's feet to be positioned correctly and safely against the handle. A further goal of this invention is to make available a system that minimizes the danger of the feet gliding too far into the frame.

In one respect, the invention in question consists of stirrups and shoes. There is at least one footprint attached to the bracket. It is made of a first layer of materials. Shoes are suitable for the riders, the shoes have a multi-layer soles.

There is a second layer of soles that is magnetised by the first one. FIG 1 shows a perspectival elevation of a riding boot and stapes after an incarnation of the present invention; FIG 2 shows an explosive representation of a first incarnation of magnet shoes after an incarnation of the present invention; FIG 3 shows an explosive representation of a second incarnation of magnet shoes after another incarnation of the present invention; FIG 3 shows an explosive representation of magnet shoes after another incarnation of the present invention.

FIG. 4 shows a side elevation of a third incarnation of magnet shoes after another incarnation of the present invention; FIG. 5 shows a basic elevation of a forth incarnation of magnet shoes after another incarnation of the present invention. This invention provides for a system of contacts to maintain constant touch between a riding boot and a stapes.

This system allows a horse to keep in touch with the stirrups of a horse during riding. Horsemen wear a pair of magnetized shoes, such as a riding boot with a magnets supplied. It has a surface of contacts or an inset containing a sheet of iron or another type of magnets aligned to attract the shoes.

When driving, the footprint is placed close to the magnets in the shoes. In standard driving manoeuvres, magnetical attraction between the shoes and the footplate maintains constant touch between the driver's legs and the handle. But when the horseman is falling, the magnetical attraction does not tie the rider's legs to the stapes.

FIG. 1 shows a perspectival elevation of a riding boot 100 and a stapes 101 after an invention. Like most well-known shoes, the riding boot has an outsole 106, which can have a running surface for grip during regular gait, and an elongated healing 102 to avoid the riding boot 100 sliding through the stapes 101 during riding.

Top of riding boot 100 may have an area 108 around the wearer's ankles, a healing area 104 and a toes area 110. The shoelaces are not required for riding shoes 100 with shoelaces 112. Climbing frame 101 is attached to the stapes of a riding semi.

While in use, the horseman places his feet in the stapes and places the feet on the 103 basis. The insert 105 is usually made of caoutchouc or other flexible materials with a running surface profile to prevent the rider's boot from sliding in the stapes. Basis 105 of the present invention is either a ferro-metallic substance or a magnetism.

The basis 105 of this invention, however, could have an external elastic coating that surrounds the iron or magnetite. FIG. 2 shows an explosive representation of a first incarnation of magnet shoes after an invention. Riding boot 200 has an top part consisting of a toes area 210, a heel area 204 and an expanded top area 208.

The upper expanded area may have lace 212, but is not necessary. Riding boot 200 also has an outsole 206 and an insole 213. The 206 outsole has 202 healing to keep the riding boot from sliding into the stapes. The 206 outsole also constitutes part of the arches for the equestrian base at 218.

The 213 insole consists of several plies of foams and other material. A top coat 216 is in touch with the rider's feet during use. Inside the strata between the top 216 and a bottom 206 outsole there is the 218 film. The 220 solenoids cover the inner soles 213 from the balls of the feet 214 to the basis of the smallest toes 222.

FIG. 3 shows an explosion drawing of a second personification of magnet shoes after another personification of the present invention. Riding boot 300 has an uppers with a 310 toes area, 304 healing area and 308 heel area. The top expanded area can have shoelace 312, but is not necessary.

Riding boot 300 also has an outsole 306 and an insole 313. The outsole 306 has a healing 302 to keep the riding boot 300 from sliding into the stapes. The 306 outsole is also part of the arches for the rider's leg at 318.

The 306 outsole can consist of several coats of plastic foams, rubbers or other material. Inset or imbedded in the 306 outsole are a number of 320 soles. The 320 solenoids cover the outsole 306 from the 314 balls of the feet to the basis of the smallest 322 toes. FIG. 4 shows a side elevation of a third incarnation of magnet shoes after another incarnation of the present invention.

Riding boot 400 has an top part consisting of a toes area 410, a healing area 404 and an expanded top area 408. The top expanded area may have shoelaces 412, but is not necessary. Riding boot 400 still has an outsole 406. The 406 outsole has a healing 402 to keep the 400 riding boot from sliding into the slingbar.

The 420 soles stretch over the outsole 406 from the basis of the smallest 322 to a point corresponding to the balls of the feet on the opposite side. FIG. 5 shows a basic image of a forth incarnation of magnet shoes after another incarnation of the present invention.

Outsole 506 has a healing area 502, toes area 506 and an area corresponding to the heel of a 522 wearer's toes. For area 522, an inlay 524 is inserted into the bottom of the outsole 506. After describing several designs of the riding boot and stapes system, the experts should be aware that certain benefits of the system have been attained.

While the bodies are equipped with magnet shoes and a metal stapes inset, a system with magnet coating and metal shoes is in the sense and extent of the present invention.

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