Show Jumping Jumps

Jumping and jumping

Jumps are colourful and often decorated with natural or artificial elements and placed in such a way that they are a challenge for horse and rider. The goals of show or stadium jumping are speed and the avoidance of knock-downs and other penalties. Equestrian Equestrian Equipment Jumping Stand Cup Rail Oakford Western Australia Kim Lindsay Equestrian Dressage Arena.

show jumping

It' important to know exactly how a stallion jumps. This is why the step is subdivided into five phases: Stage 1: The rapprochement The equilibrium of the horses, with swing and rythm. Speed jumps are very much dependent on the speed at which they are approached.

To a large extent, the leap itself is dependent on the right procedure. Stage 2: Before the start, the horses lower their heads and stretch their necks, measure the fences and prepare for early morning. When he takes off, he slightly reduces his throat, rises his forequarters from the floor, immediately bends his knee and folds up his front legs.

Then he puts his ankles under him, and when his rear legs hit the floor, he extends his forehead and throat and uses the force of his hindleg to jump forward and up. Stage 3: The moment of hanging In the sky, the rider straightens his front and throat.

Hindlegs that have exited the floor are following the parable of the skull. Unless the rider lowers his back, does not lower or flatten his back, the leap is ineffective and he must make more efforts to clear the area. Stage 4: Landing The horses front feet are straightened and prepared for the floor.

For a moment he lifts his skull in order to find his equilibrium. Its front limbs land one after the other, followed by the rear limbs. Its back should stay flexible so that its hindlegs can move well under it before they come into contact with the floor. Horses straighten their front feet and prepare themselves for the floor.

For a moment he lifts his skull in order to find his equilibrium. Its front limbs land one after the other, followed by the rear limbs. Its back should stay flexible so that its hindlegs can move well under it before they come into contact with the floor. This is the simplest jumping, starting with a round of jumps that must be done clean, in the right order and within the timeframe (based on a regular gallop speed).

Timing is measured from the horse's nostrils through the starting vanes to the chequered flag. When your stallion jumps in slippery, narrow curves and at light bends, he must drive too quickly - this technique is preferable as it is most safe for both the stallion and sitter.

In this case, the jumps receive a value number, where the simplest jumps have the smallest number and the toughest jumps have the highest number. You do not have to do jumps in sequence of numbers and not all jumps have to be done. The starting and finishing flag are arranged in such a way that they can be traversed from both directions.

The horsemen form their own course, taking into account the abilities of their horses. You can only score two jumps and each further one is a complete wastage. The jumps can be made from both sides or from the same side.

Every missed leap is not scored and is not hung up again until the round is over. At the end of your turn, when the referee is ringing the bells, drive through the banners as fast as possible - the period between the ringing of the bells and the passing of the banners is counted if there are horsemen with the same number of points.

First horseman begins his lap and proceeds until he either makes a mistake, finishes the lap or the referee bells. If the first driver has a knockdown, the second driver will take over the lap beginning with the leap after the knockdown. If the first driver is rejected, the second driver will take the course on the rejected vault (if he was beaten down during the rejection, he must await repositioning).

When the first driver has completed the lap without any mistakes and the bells have not sounded, the second driver will take step I and continue - checkered flag does not work. Replacing drivers in the event of a fault will continue as described above until the bells ring to complete the lap.

When the second driver is the one finishing the first lap (i.e. the first driver had a mistake), it continues from the last leap to the first one. Once the magistrate has rung the bells, your turn is over and you should skip the next leap in that order.

With the same placement, the period from the bells until the next leap is taken is used to part them. For the first round, the max. heigths are:: It is 8 cm higher than the maximal altitude for jumping in the equestrian competition or in combined training.

jumps of up to 0.93m are possible for a D-degree jumps or velocity events.

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