What do you Feed Horses

Why do you feed horses?

Which horses do they eat to keep them healthy? Horse's natural diet consists of pasture grass and delicate plants. The protein, fat, vitamins and minerals are important components of your horse's diet, but are not needed in large quantities.

Horse Feed - Kentucky Equine Research

And if you like your horses (and which owners don't?), you probably like to feed them from then on. Whatever you give him, your stallion likes to devour and wants more. Everybody in your barn has a different vision of what kind of delicacies are best, which should be prevented and how and when to feed them.

The horses are designed to continuously consume small quantities of nourishment so that your horses ALWAYS want another tidbit, but for their well-being you should be taught to say no. Which you can provide as a delicacy. Nearly all fruit and lots of vegetable are sure delicacies for wholesome horses. Certainly you can serve your own sultanas, grape, banana, strawberry, Kantaloupe or other melon, sellerie, pumpkin and chickpeas.

While most horses will be chewing these delicacies before they swallow, horses that swallow large chunks of a piece of fruits or vegetables are at great risks of asphyxiation. Be sure to chop the delicacies into smaller chunks before use. One or two sugary dices or peppermints (one or two) are fine, as are many of the commercial horsemeat delicacies available for sale in horsemeat catalogues.

I don't have what to bid. While some horses, such as a little bit of cocoa and a little bit of cocoa, do not do any harm, try to prevent your horses from taking part in activities where drugs can be tested because ingredients in the cocoa can cause a test to be positively saturated. What a lot to have. The best deal for all the above delicacies is "not very much".

" That means one or two chunks of each tasty dish will do. The horses are designed to continuously consume small quantities of nourishment so that your horses ALWAYS want another tidbit, but for their well-being you should be taught to say no. Every delicacy adds a calorie that most horses do not need, but the more important factor in limiting the delicacy is that the horse's alimentary system contains a sensitive equilibrium of germs and other germs that are vital for bowel functioning.

It' s unbelievably simple to disturb this equilibrium, especially by eating things that are not part of the regular nutrition. Feed too many delicacies of any kind can trigger a chain of incidents that can lead to colics or other diseases. Some more thoughts on delicacies. The delicacies can be supplied by manual feed or by placing them in a pail or feed-tarough.

A few horses that are manually bred have a tendency to become fresh; others have better habits. The use of a pail is probably the most safe, but if you want to feed by your hands, place the delicacy in the centre of your shallow hands and think about sliding it slightly towards the horse's jaw instead of pulling your hands back when he grabs it.

It is this unintentional act of the owners that often causes the horses to get out for treatment. Do not get used to feed your horses every single morning, and certainly do not give your horses food on a daily schedule, e.g. after every class in the ring. When he starts expecting treatment at a certain point in his life and doesn't get it, you can ask for misconduct.

Little plays, not too often, only a few at a stroke, do not give way when it comes to these imploring looks. Because you have restricted your horse's "extras" and only feed them in small quantities, your horses will feel better.

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